Waid, Candace

Position: 
Professor
Status: 
Current

Basic information

Office: 
South Hall 2519
Availability: 
Fall
Winter
Spring
Office Hours: 
Summer- please email
Telephone: 
(805) 893-7489
FAX: 
(805) 893-7491
Email: 
waid@english.ucsb.edu
Research Interests: 

Contact Info

Mailing Address: 

English Department
UC Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3170

Highlights

Recent News: 

Candace Waid was awarded the 2006-2011 Jim Hinkle Memorial Prize for her essay in the The Faulkner Journal, "Burying the Regional Mother: Faulkner's Road to Race through the Visual Arts." This prize is awarded every 5 years for an essay that has made "a unique and lasting contribution to Faulkner."

Research

Bio: 

Candace Waid is Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is also affiliated with the Comparative Literature Program. Her central interests include American literature and culture, African American literature, Southern literature, Native American literature, gender studies, and the visual arts. Professor Waid’s books include Edith Wharton's Letters from the Underworld: Fictions of Women and Writing, The Signifying Eye: Seeing Faulkner’s Art, and the Norton Critical Edition of Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence. She has published essays and articles on Welty, Chesnutt, Wharton, and Faulkner, among other authors, as well as numerous editions of Wharton’s works. She recently published “Faulkner and Southern Literature: Reading the Reverse Slave Narrative,” in the Cambridge History of the American Novel.

Areas of Interest: 
American Literature and Culture
Gender Studies
African American Literature
Southern Literature
Native American Literaure
Literature and the Visual Arts
Regionalism and Modernism
Education: 
Ph.D., Yale University, 1986
Articles & Chapters: 
  • “De Kooning’s Faulkner Trilogy,” Picturing Faulkner: William Faulkner and the Visual Arts, ed. Randall Wilhelm (Knoxville: Univ. Press of Tennessee, 2012)
  • “Bearing Witness: The Political Power of Female Voice in Chesnutt’s Conjure Tales,” in Charles Chesnutt, The Conjure Tales of Charles Chesnutt, ed. Robert Stepto, Norton Critical Edition (New York, W.W. Norton, 2011, forthcoming)
  • “Faulkner and Southern Literature: Reading the Reverse Slave Narrative,” Cambridge History of the American Novel, (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2010)
Forthcoming Projects: 
  • Blood Union: Conjuring the Conjugal and Other Arts in Southern Narrative
  • The Birmingham Fire Department Reads “Othello”: Memoirs of Others